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110 books

Prescription for Nutritional Healing: A Practical A-to-Z Reference to Drug-Free Remedies Using Vitamins, Minerals, Herbs & Food Supplements

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4.37 rating

Comment 1: Prescription for Nutritional Healing: The A-to-Z Guide to Supplements by Phyllis A. BalchI have read a number of nutrition books over the last few years but this book by Balch ranks at the top of the pile in my estimation. The vast amount of useful and relevant information contained within the cover is astounding. Every nutritionist should have a copy of this book on his or her bookshelf. In fact, I would even go so far as to say that anybody interested in improving his or her health through nutrition should have a copy of this book. There are more than 1.75 million copies of this book in print; that speaks volumes about the benefits this book provides readers.Balch discusses how nutrition, diet and wellness are entwined in creating good health. There is great material covering vitamins, minerals, air quality, water, amino acids, antioxidants, enzymes, natural food supplements, herbs, and drug interactions we should aware of.Let us look at how Balch presents this information. Take vitamins for example. First, she gives us a general understanding of the role of the item in question. Then she tells us where we can find that item in the foods we eat. She also provides any comments and cautions that we need to be aware of. Vitamin D is necessary for bodily absorption of calcium and phosphorous, necessary for growth and many other things. Some of the best sources of Vitamin D are fatty saltwater fish, dairy products and eggs. But be careful taking too much Vitamin D (more than 1000 IU daily) as it will decrease bone mass.This book has been one of the biggest and best information sources that I have read about healing with nutrition. Some of the other books that I have do present information better is some areas and are weaker in others. This tome is strong throughout the entire length.This is definitely one nutrition book everybody should have.Happy Reading,

Pharmako/Poeia: Plant Powers, Poisons, and Herbcraft

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4.54 rating

Comment 1: Dale Pendell is further proof that you can hold the wisdom and experience of the sages and still come across as a logical scientific human being. He's even a software engineer! This book looked so goddamn weird I had to buy it, and in the end, it was still pretty goddamn weird. It's hard to neatly categorize and recommend because it gives a broad scope on so many topics—drugs, drugs in history, drugs in culture, poetry, preparation tips, personal anecdotes (sometimes funny, sometimes poignant). Comment 2: More like an epic poem than a treatise on plant drugs but chocked full of information. It ties in alchemy and sometimes a touch of Carlos Castaneda. Beautiful, fun and educational. I picked this up while listening to a phenomenal online course "Drugs and the Brain" taught by David Presti, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley and offered through iTunes University for free. This was the main textbook of the course. Comment 3: For anyone interested in the visionary uses of botanicals, there is simply no better writer on the subject than Dale Pendell. It seems safe to say that, as with Amazonian shamans, plants speak through Pendell. Few authors can balance the poetic against the historical and practical like he does. Can't recommend this highly enough, for those on "the poison path."

Back To Eden

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4.16 rating

Comment 1: (Also posted on my site The Paperback Stash)Jethro Kloss was a true healer and crusader for nutrition, personal rights, freedoms, and herbalism. This huge book was his biggest work and deserves to be celebrated for what it is: a lifetime gathering of intense study and dedication to the good of man. And why, yes, I DO live to sound dramatic.He discusses everything he can think of here. While some of his viewpoints and procedures are now frowned upon - and a few of the herbal remedies taken to the degree he suggests are now believed to be dangerous - the large bulk of his remedies and procedures are still regarded as safe and, in some circles, preferable to things available in modern medicine and society.Everything from his personal life and influences, to farming techniques, crops, growing fruits and vegetables, an extensive listing of fruits, veggies, minerals, vitamins, the history of herbal medicine, herbs, their uses, the body system, the health benefits of water, fish, fresh air, exercise, sleep patterns, oatmeal, fiber, breads, salts, milk, etc is included here. He even gives his favorite baking recipes, natural ways to make breads, cakes, soups and more, as well as hints on preserving vitamins, cooking utensils to avoid and use, not to mention desserts and beverages.One really fascinating thing about this book is the large section devoted to water and hydrotherapy. Here we get a rundown of the history of the water cure, various ways to use water to treat - from saunas to foreign bath treatments - temperatures to use when a person is ill to fit their condition, and much much more. Excellent!This massive bible of sorts ends with various enemas and their purposes, charcoal, guides for people wanting to be a nurse, and different massage techniques. You couldn't ask for much more in one volume. Sure, a little of it is outdated but most of it stands true today and shall forever. The man is to respected, and his remedies and treatments are invaluable.Many of his formula is similar or almost identical to the great Dr. John R Christophers, another pioneer of herbal medicine, the modern Dr. Schulz who has a following of his own, and several other herbalists, naturopaths, massage therapists, hydrotherapists, and nutritionists.And, even more incredibly, it's under 10 bucks to own - amazing considering its offering.Buy it? Of course! Why wouldn't you?

The Green Pharmacy: The Ultimate Compendium Of Natural Remedies From The World's Foremost Authority On Healing Herbs

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4.16 rating

Comment 1: I love the Green Pharmacy books! I have three - just recently acquired The Green Pharmacy Guide to Healing Foods that I haven't read yet. I use this book and the Green Pharmacy Herbal Handbook as fantastic guides! In this book, you can look up by symptoms or what you know is wrong (migraines, for example) and get herbal advice as to what to use and how to use it. The Herbal Handbook is the opposite - you can look things up by herb so you know what a particular herb (for example: rosemary) is goo Comment 2: No references! Rather odd book for a scientist. Big reliance on Commission E,which seems to be a German herb approval body from the 90's. None of their monographs have scientific references either. Note that James distributes the Commission E data in the US through the American Botanical Council-James A Duke award anyone? Like most herbalism tracts is seems to be a collection of non-scientifically tested folklore. Comment 3: This is my go to book for herbs to look up remedies under the ailment. James Duke is brilliant, has a Ph.D. and has worked extensively with herbs. I went to hear him speak at a weekend conference at Bastyr University I attended and was in awe of this man. The book is easy to understand, laid out well and one of the very best of my many herbal books.

Herbal Medicine: Revised & Updated

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4.4 rating

This practical, detailed manual tells how to choose and use easily obtainable herbs to prevent and relieve such common ailments as headaches, muscular pain, sore throat, fever and more. Learn to use herbs to change the way you look and feel. ****28 b&w illus. 6 x 9.

Witches' Bane

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3.88 rating

Comment 1: Three stars for the mystery, only one for China herself. She is undoubtedly one of the most selfish and mean-spirited women I have come across. Selfish because she's only considering her own needs in the book, not those of other people, and mean-spirited because she is just plain MEAN to her mother. Her mom, who is going through a 12 step program, comes to China to say she is sorry and wants to have a relationship with her daughter. She knows they will never be close, but she wants something, anything. She is also getting married again, since her husband has been dead for ten years. (China doesn't like this at all, although why she should care is beyond me). She apologizes to China and tells her the reasons why she acted the way she did. Most people would try to understand. They'd realize that Leatha just doesn't have it in her to be a strong person (many people aren't), and that she was beaten down by her own father and her husband. China basically tells her to screw off. What kind of person is she, anyway? If I were McQuaid (her semi-boyfriend), I would run as fast as I could. Who wants to get involved with someone like this? Someone who has no heart within them, no understanding, no forgiveness. These are qualities that are admirable in people. They show strength of character. She's using her mother as a crutch, as the reason not to get involved with McQuaid or have relationships with other people. Who's the codependent one now?Plus, her friend Ruby is involved in a murder, and the suspect is Ruby's latest boyfriend. Ruby is a New Ager, and dresses like an escapee from a circus. Either she does it for shock value or she just doesn't have any taste in clothes. At any rate, I can't see a man in a small Texas town going, "Wow, that lady sure is someone I'd like to spend time with!". (Especially since she's six feet tall and wears stilettos).I can't say whether I'll read another book in this series or not. The reason I continued on to this one is because it takes place at Halloween, and I'm reading books about the season (since we're so close to it ourselves). If I do, and China's attitude toward people doesn't change, I won't waste my time reading through the rest of the series.Oh, and nobody ever says "y'all". I lived in Austin for five years, my Dad was a Texan raised in Fort Worth, my relatives still live there. EVERYBODY says "y'all" except the people in this town, obviously.....

Thyme of Death

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3.84 rating

Comment 1: Another themed mystery, or 'cookie cutter' as they were described. I think I get pulled in by the puns in the titles as much as anything but this series has reasonable, realistic (mostly)characters and the situations are not stretched too far. This is the first in the series so there's a lot of setting the situation, describing characters and their relationships to each other. I like the way China goes in and out of her lawyer persona because it's what a real person would do. If a discussion begins to involve elementary schools/libraries I hear my voice change even though I've been retired for six years. I'm not like the Mason sisters in this book but I do still find the casual attitude to sex found in even cozy mysteries a bit off-putting. Perhaps that was what "Mostly Murder" meant in describing China as 'totally a woman of the nineties'. I like China, though, sensible and realistic and Ruby is a lot of fun usually. These characters have staying power and it isn't surprising that the series has gone on for such a long time. The fear of being 'outed' would certainly, especially in the early nineties, have been strong enough to put people at risk of threats, blackmail and even murder, so that part of the story is quite reasonable (if that's the right word)and those involved behave pretty much as you would expect. The involvement of the Disney Corporation was just what one would expect in that situation and the complications were most believable, well, mostly. I don't know small town Texas, so there are some bits I wouldn't know.Cover: this is getting to be a thing, or "thang" as East Texans apparently say. The house on the cover - oh rats, forgot to find "my" edition! Anyway, a Queen Anne house behind trees and a stone story and a half with front porch. Unfortunately the house is supposed to have been built by a German stone mason who did a beautiful job of laying the blocks. In the picture the house is built of river rock, what's with that upstairs?, the front entry doesn't work for the two businesses and there is no herb garden out front.What I learned: East Texan men say 'bidness' when talking business and if you don't want bits of scorched garlic, put the whole clove in with the onions then mash the garlic once it's softened.Yes, I enjoyed this book. I either had to hide the review or write in general terms. Chose the latter.

Green Pharmacy: The History and Evolution of Western Herbal Medicine

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4.25 rating

Comment 1: This is such a cool book! If I could give it more stars, I would. It's all about the history of herbal and chemical medicine. You wouldn't think this would be a page turner, but it totally is! It describes the "ground breakers" in each field and why they were so important. I was amazed that the same herbs used today were used way back in history for the exact same ailments! Very cool book. Comment 2: Wonderful tale of the roots and politics of herbal medicine over the centuries, replete with wonderfully outspoken characters.

Ginseng Dreams: The Secret World of America's Most Valuable Plant

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4.18 rating

American Ginseng has a strange and perilous history. It has one of the longest germination periods of any known species, and only two environments in the world have offered the ideal growing conditions for wild ginseng. The first was the forests of northern China, which disappeared over a millennium ago, and the sole remaining habitat is the Appalachian Mountain region of eastern North America, an area now threatened by logging and mining. Chinese legend says that ginseng is the child of lightning. The two elemental forces of water and fire fight in an eternal struggle, pouring down rain and snow and blasting the earth with lightning. If that lightning happens to strike a spring of water, the water disappears and in its place grows a ginseng plant -- the fusion of yin and yang, water and fire, darkness and light, and the life force that moves the universe. American ginseng has become perhaps the most treasured of all herbal medicines, promising good health and longevity to those who consume it. Fortunes have been made and lost on the plant, which was America's first export to China -- before our nation even existed. The strange, twisted, man-shaped root today commands as much as two thousand dollars a pound in the hot, noisy ginseng markets of Hong Kong, and a wealthy collector might pay as much as $10,000 for a single, perfect specimen. Ginseng Dreams: The Secret World of America's Most Valuable Plant unfolds ginseng's past and its future through the stories of seven people whose lives have become inextricably bound to it: a huckster, a field researcher, a farmer, a ginseng "missionary," a criminal investigator, a broker, and a cancer researcher. Each of these individuals brings a different perspective to the elusive root -- and each is consumed by a different dream. Kristin Johannsen threads her way though remote woodlands in the Appalachians to observe the fragile plants slowly putting out leaves as part of a three-year growing cycle, during which time the ginseng is vulnerable to both poachers and growing suburban sprawl. She contrasts this with the huge commercial growing fields of Marathon County, Wisconsin, where among potato fields and paper mills, ninety percent of the country's ginseng is produced. Johannsen explores the brisk black market trade in the panacean root and the efforts to save the wild species and its native habitat, and she ends her story in the laboratory, where researchers are investigating ginseng's anti-cancer properties. An absorbing journey into the many worlds of this mysterious and potent plant, Ginseng Dreams tells the extraordinary story of America's little-known natural treasure and the spell it casts on those who seek it.

Brother Cadfael's Herb Garden: An Illustrated Companion to Medieval Plants and Their Uses

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4.22 rating

Comment 1: Lovely illustrated book dedicated to Edith Pargeter (Ellis Peters) who wrote the wonderful Cadfael books. Descriptions of Cadfael's work as a healer, quotes from the books and other history books, and an A to Z section of all the medieval herbs and plants used by the monk. Comment 2: This is one to buy, although unfortunately it seems to be out of print. Excellent quotes from the Cadfael books and historical sources, gorgeous photos, interesting information about herbs. Comment 3: I wish that wasn't out of print... I would so buy it. Not only does Cadfael rock, but I'm always on the lookout for books concerning uses of plants/herbs in medieval times. Comment 4: A very nicely illustrated and researched book that would be of interest to anyone interested in herbs, medieval monastic life and Brother Cadfael.

The Faerie's Guide to Green Magick from the Garden

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4.04 rating

Green magick, or stewardship of the earth, begins right in our own backyards. When we cultivate an herb garden—even if it’s just a few potted plants on a sunny windowsill—we are tending living, sentient beings who respond to our intention, our energy, and our tender loving care. The “fae” (faerie) essence residing at the heart of each nurtured plant manifests in its foliage, flowers, fragrance, and flavor, and its unique healing, nourishing, and restorative properties.        In The Faeries’ Guide to Green Magick from the Garden author and free-fae-spirit Jamie Wood offers fresh, faerie-centric profiles of thirty-three familiar medicinal and culinary herbs accompanied by recipes for natural healing remedies, earth-friendly beauty products, and tasty treats. Fantasy artist Lisa Steinke pairs each herb with a vibrant portrait of its personality—its unique faerie signature—in her lyrical poetry and luminous paintings.       With blissful blessings, magickal meditations, and zesty spells sprinkled throughout, The Faeries Guide to Green Magick from the Garden will help you get in touch with your own fae spirit and explore the earthly—and earthy—delights of your own garden.  

Grow Your Own Drugs: Easy Recipes for Natural Remedies and Beauty Treats

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3.95 rating

Comment 1: Just picked this up yesterday and poured through it. It's hard not to when each page-spread is peppered with lovely color photographs. The recipes are great and use a lot of common, easily grown or found ingredients. I already made one recipe (the athlete's foot powder) just from stuff in my kitchen. It has a UK resource section for the "must purchase" items, which is helpful to me, personally... though in the US you could easily find most of these items at health-food coops. Comment 2: I have the most recent edition of this book. Fun, enjoyable introduction to the world of herbs from the PBS TV series host. Simple enough to try out at home without making a major investment in herbal materials. Beautifully photographed. The plant directory at the end of the book contains a short description of the plants used in the book, and general guides on how to find them. A good book for beginners and people interested in trying out some fun and useful recipes. Comment 3: The perfect accompaniment to the first Grow Your Own Drugs. Like the first book, it contains over 100 new remedies for a wide spectrum of maladies, but unlike the first one, it contains a seasonal planner so you know what to grow when. I'm looking forward to attempting to 'grow my own pharmacy', although I may have to start small with window-boxes, as my rabbits eat anything and everything that they find in the garden!

Nightshade

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3.96 rating

Comment 1: Of all the China Bayles’ books that I’ve read, this one is my least favorite. That being said, it wasn’t a bad book, I just didn’t enjoyed as much as the previous ones. It was great to see the usual characters, and some new ones as well, but overall I thought that it was just too much going on. With all the goings on, what I was looking forward was her interaction with her niece. I saw China’s tough exterior (in relation to her brother) melt away with each interaction with the little girl. Comment 2: In Susan Wittig Albert's Nightshade, the 16th installment in the China Bayles mystery series, this tale dealt with hard core topics and bitter rivals that came from the past. After China's friend Ruby grieved the loss of her lover Colin, China dealt with her half-brother's mysterious visit to see her. She didn't know him about him, until it was too late. When her husband Mike McQuaid was supposed to met him to talk about reopening the investigation on their father's murder, Miles ended up a vict Comment 3: What a ride! I felt so bad for China as she endured the events in this one -- and relived the past events which sparked the present. I loved the camaraderie of the circle of women which form part of the core characters in this series -- loved their spa party for Ruby which brought to mind the spa day fund-raiser for our AAUW group which I attended not all that long ago. I have a coupon from that day and I think I should locate it and go have that massage! I foresee a growing relationship between

Widow's Tears

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3.93 rating

Comment 1: I’ve read the China Bayles series from the beginning and the murder mysteries are always so incredibly awesome! So when I picked this one up and it wasn’t really a murder mystery, but rather a supernatural story about ghosts, I was… disappointed. Don’t get me wrong, the storyline itself, for what it was, was very well written. The author has always done a great job of building a thrilling story with a detailed setting that keeps you drawn in to the plot. And the characters are, as usual, real an Comment 2: I have long been a fan of the China Bayles herbal mysteries but this one, I believe, is my favorite of them all. This time out the tale is really Ruby's. She gets a call from a old friend who needs some psychic help with a house that she has inherited. Ruby, feeling torn in too many directions with business, family, and her grief over her lover's death thinks taking the time to go to her friend's assistance might be a well-deserved vacation of sorts. It turns out to be nothing of the kind. Runni Comment 3: Even though this is a book in the China Bayles mystery series it is not a mystery. There is a subplot about a series of bank robberies but it is a very small part of the book and solution is pretty much what the reader expects. This is in reality a ghost story using characters already established by the author in her mystery series. It is in fact a very good ghost story. Not horror but a rather sad but gentle story of a woman so consumed by grief that even in death she cannot rest. The most comp

Indigo Dying

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3.9 rating

Comment 1: A much better than average cozy mystery. I have not read any of the China Bayles series before, and while there were several references to what I assume were earlier stories, I didn't feel like I was really missing anything by coming in at Book 11. The story is a well plotted "town bully" story with several other subplots thrown in. Casey Ford owns most of the tiny town of Indigo, Texas, and he's as means as a prairie blizzard. When he's killed shortly after announcing his plans to sell the mini Comment 2: Ms. Albert does it again, a solid story made more interesting with the herbology added in. I knew who did it very quickly which is why I gave the story a three but WHY the killer did it was a surprise as was the story of one of the murder victims. China Bayles and Ruby, her friend and business partner, are in Indigo, Texas to participate in one the town's festivals. While there China co-teaches a dying workshop with a friend from college. While there China and Ruby, along with China's husband an Comment 3: What makes this book so interesting is not the mystery, although that was good, but rather the herbal dye lore and the herbal dye information. Even if you have no interest in DIY dyeing or spinning fiber, understanding the process goes a long way toward appreciating the effort that these artisans put into their work. China and Ruby are in Indigo, TX to show at a craft fair and for China to teach a dyeing class with an old friend. But things are about to explode in Indigo. The owner of most of th

A Dilly of a Death

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3.95 rating

Comment 1: City lawyer-turned-small-town-herbalist China Bayles is once again primed for a dilly of a time both in her personal life and with amateur sleuthing in Pecan Springs, Texas. First, her best friend's daughter turns up on her (China's) doorstep, pregnant. Meanwhile, China's husband decides that teaching is a yawner and he'd rather be a private detective. (Which, of course, will make it easier for China to be on hand for future Pecan Springs sleuthing adventures!)Additionally, China has found herself on the planning committee for the annual PickleFest. However, the big event shuts down before it even happens when torrential rain washes through Pecan Springs ... and the Pickle Queen (aka Phoebe Morgan, owner of Morgan's Premier Pickles and hostess of PickleFest, washes up dead from an underground tank at the pickle factory.Only Mother Nature can be blamed for the rain, but it's not so easy to pinpoint Phoebe's killer. Before Phoebe's death, she had become China's husband's first P.I. client and he'd quickly confirmed Phoebe's suspicion that her plant manager has had his hand in the till. Then Phoebe's young live-in lover turns up an apparent suicide. Meanwhile, a string of unrelated robberies (one endng in death) around town has China's friend, Police Chief Sheila, in danger of losing her job.As delicately and seamlessly as creating lace, Susan Wittig Albert takes a cast of quirky characters and a slapdash of situations in which nothing is as it seems, and weaves a fully satisfying mystery. I highly recommend it, especially for fans of the China Bayles series.

Holly Blues

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3.83 rating

Comment 1: China Bayles is a most understanding woman--she allows Sally, the ex-wife of her husband to stay with the family for Christmas because Sally needs to spend some time with her son who lives with China and Mike McQuaid. However, Sally has major problems of her own, and they have followed her to Pecan Springs, disrupting the idyllic holiday plans China has carefully laid. Keeping Sally safe after her sister and an old friend back home are run over brings out the sleuthing skills of Mike and China, Comment 2: I've been reading Susan Wittig Albert's China Bayles series for several years, and, of course, since I'm an OCD reader, I read the books in the order that they were published. But in looking at a list of the books in the series recently, I realized that I had somehow managed to skip one. Horrors! Comment 3: This is the first China Bayles story I've read ... it's apparently the 18th in the series. I was attracted to it because it's a mystery with a female detective (even though she owns an herb/tea shop).

Stalking the Healthful Herbs

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4.12 rating

Comment 1: This is an older book without ID sketches or other features that could be really helpful and it's not an end-all guide to medicinal wild plants at all. Indeed, Gibbons got a lot of his information simply from reading through many old books (often going back many centuries) and compiling what those authors said. Comment 2: This DOES NOT read like an encyclopedia, but rather, like prose. I'm going to try making the pine cough syrup from the trees in my backyard.

A Druid's Herbal for the Sacred Earth Year

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3.93 rating

Comment 1: This book had a profound effect on my spiritual life. I was already an herbalist when I read it but by the end of the book I decided to seriously study Druidism. Up to that time I had skimmed through information on Druidry, read the myths and had an interest but this book set me solidly on the path I was to follow for life. Comment 2: Very useful on a number of different levels. If one is a practicing pagan, with an eye to the Celtic, then this is very handy. Or if one is just trying to live on this earth in a friendlier manner, then the use of plants is very useful.

Holly Blues

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3.85 rating

Comment 1: Yes, still reading these because they are simple for a busy time! I was even willing to read this one set at Christmas time. I loved learning all the legends and facts about holly--one of my favorite plants. I think what appeals about the writing is that some of it is in first person--the voice of the main character, China, who is the main detective in these. That writing is contrasted with straight narrative--in this book that was mostly about China's husband, McQuaid, who was detecting in anot Comment 2: First off let me say that I have not read any of this series and that I do realize this is the 18th. I picked it up because it had a Christmas theme. As you can see by the 2 stars I didn't think much of this book. I can't go into detail without spoilers so all I will say was nothing much happened in the mail plot but lots seemed to happen in the secondary characters lives. Too bad it would only mean something to followers of the series. I was bored enough with what was going on that I kept stopp Comment 3: I enjoyed this book. It was the Christmas season with holiday cooking, decorating, and activities. McQuaid's ex--Brian's mom Sally-- showed up with no resources and no place to stay for the holidays. China invited her to their home, and things soon got complicated with Sally implicated in several murders that occurred, a dangerous man stalking Sally, Sally disappearing, and China and Ruby looking into the crimes while McQuaid was out of town on another case. The investigation and solution were i

Hands-On Healing Remedies: 150 Recipes for Herbal Balms, Salves, Oils, Liniments & Other Topical Therapies

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4.11 rating

Keep your family healthy and chemical free by making your own natural remedies. Stephanie Tourles offers 150 original recipes for herbal balms, oils, salves, liniments, and other topical ointments to treat a wide range of conditions. This comprehensive guide is filled with safe and effective cures for scores of common ailments, including headaches, backaches, arthritis, insomnia, splinters, and more. Take control of your well-being and stock your family’s medicine cabinet with gentle, all-natural homemade healing formulations.

Garden Spells

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3.44 rating

Comment 1: Nice little book on information pulled from the authors Great Grandmothers notes. Her Great Grandmother was a wisewoman, aka white witch, in England. A few of the plants like briony are not common to the USA but it is an interesting little read. There are not many spells but there are what were the believed uses for the plants mentioned. Some are things I have seen in modern herbal books. Others I would take with a grain of salt since they come from plants that can be dangerous. Comment 2: A dear friend gave me a copy of this book many years ago and i enjoyed it thoroughly. Interesting to read even if you are not a gardener...and even if you dont believe in fairies! Comment 3: it's a brilliant take on the traditional value of family and community, and tradition. it's a fabulous read. i loved it.

The Home Reference to Holistic Health and Healing: Easy-to-Use Natural Remedies, Herbs, Flower Essences, Essential Oils, Supplements, and Therapeutic Practices for Health, Happiness, and Well-Being

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4.03 rating

Comment 1: This reference was quick and easy to follow. As someone who is not a novice but certainly not an expert in holistic health, the tone was spot on, not too obvious but not too pretentious. That being said, it's clear the authors have not experienced anxiety themselves. Don't tell an anxious person to "be busy because busy people don't have time to worry." But, it's easy to skip their additional techniques and really dive into the herbs, supplements, flowers etc. I will definitely keep this book as Comment 2: I loved this book because it was very easy to read and interesting. It also had quite a bit of insightful information that one could use for overall health. I liked the fact that this book focuses on natural remedies and tips instead of prescription medication! Great read! Comment 3: I really enjoyed learning more about natural ways to deal with common health problems. This is a good guide.

Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs (Llewellyn's Sourcebook Series)

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4.28 rating

Comment 1: i love this book - i wander around the yard with it - i practically read it to my plants. the history and folklore adds so much to my gardening experience and i get totally excited when somebody asks about this or that herb i have in a dish near my front door or tied in a bundle over the fireplace. each plant reference includes: latin name, folk name, gender, planet, element, deities, powers, uses, whether or not it's poisonous, and a black n white botanical sketch of the plant. mint is no longer mint - it's a plant at the end of driveway keeping out evil spirits and promoting good neighbor relations. i don't really believe in evil spirits but since all the neighbors stop to rub and sniff the plant and also say hello, i cannot argue with this book! it's also amusing to think of ones grandmother wandering around town with a potato in her purse trying not to catch a cold. we have come a long way with modern science but have lost so much of the romance of 'lore'. why can't we have both! Comment 2: Originally posted here:http://nancythroughthelookingglass.bl...The Book is clearly laid out and easy to use, with many different herbs and flowers covered, many common ones and a few herbs I'd never heard of and objects thought of as magical items, like carrots and potatoes. It Gives you the name of the herb with a line drawing of it it's folk names gender planet element and powers, as well as it's magical uses.I'd recommend the book to anyone with an interest in herbs whether it be magical or not as it gives some fascinating information about the plants and their folk history. If your interest in them is magical then it's also very good as a reference book and has chapter on the powers of herbs and how to perform magic with them which is easy to understand, it explains how to charge herbs before using them in spells amongst other things.I use this book quite regularly in my work and think it would give a valuable contribution to any pagan library.

A Kitchen Witch's World of Magical Herbs & Plants

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4.21 rating

Comment 1: I think this book will always be open and listed as currently reading. So much info that I keep going back and re-reading parts, it's a wonderful book with helpful tips, recipes and much, much more! It's like one of those old family recipe books that gets handed down.

Magical Aromatherapy: The Power of Scent

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4.02 rating

Comment 1: Another book passed on by a friend. The print date is 20 years ago! The information in this book seems timeless! This book has descriptions of herbs and plants the part of the plant used,the planet, the element and the magical influences. also a "recipe" part for the mixing of essential oils to make a blend for specific purposes. For example, cash flow oil and protection oil. Comment 2: As with all of Cunningham's books, this one is packed full of useful and practical information. This particular book discusses how to use aromatherapy--specifically essential oils--in magical practices. Giving an overview of safe usage, Cunningham covers using oils for specific magical practices and purposes. Comment 3: Great reference tool for those who own it. Very informative on the history of aromatherapy. Full of information on using fresh and dried herbs and plants in home instead of essential oils. Also alot of information on the costly process of getting essential oils from the plants. Comment 4: Another great Cunningham resource, this one based on using aromatherapy for magical purposes. This one is more reference than recipes, with entries for many different essential oils and plants that can be used both for aromatheraputic and for magical purposes.

Bud, Blossom, & Leaf: The Magical Herb Gardener's Handbook

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4.03 rating

Comment 1: I'm kinda on the fence with this one. It has a lot of really interesting points like what kinds of herbs to grow to attract particular energies into your garden, and certain themes for your garden. There's lots of great information on how to live green around your entire home. But, for anyone with a little expirience, there's way too much info on growing and caring for your garden. A lot of really basic stuff, that is great for a beginer, but was too elementary for me. It also suggested a lot of Comment 2: Good basic info on gardening, with timeframes and chants/phrases/spells for making a better garden, helping seeds get going, and types of garden one can set up.

The Yoga of Herbs: An Ayurvedic Guide to Herbal Medicine

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4.28 rating

Comment 1: During the era of Lord Buddha the land now known as India was adorned with lush gardens and parks, ponds of lotus flowers bristling with swelling buds, palaces and pleasure pavilions. On Spring evenings these throbbed with song and dance as mango anointed breezes pierced the hearts of young ladies and their lovers. Beautiful courtesans, female dancers, poets and musicians employed by great rajas gladdened these grounds with their presence. At that time, Indian philosophy, literature and art effloresced. Great poets and their royal audiences were as intimately intertwined as word (nama) and meaning (rupa), and the immortal stanzas of the renowned bard Kalidasa rumbled through the domes of noble palaces like dark monsoon clouds among peaks, thunderous with flashes of blinding delight. In those days, the government was benign, the citizens were law-abiding, and the rajas were Hindu. Chinese pilgrims seeking the sacred places of Buddhism wrote of the Indians as numerous, moral and happy. Vegetarian food was common, and only the lower classes and foreigners used garlic and onions. Rest homes were provided along the roads for weary travelers. There they would find sattvic food, beds and drink. The pilgrims came from many lands, thirsty for the scholarly education they could obtain at the glorious university at Nalanda, India’s crest jewel in the realm of learning, rivaled not even by Plato’s Academy in Greece. The Buddha himself frequented the mango grove at Nalunda, where all the arts and sciences were taught, including Ayurveda. It was during this era that a great Raja of Orissa came to power. This mighty Raja was most generous, and virtuous, a mighty sacrificer, and truthful, handsome and intelligent. He presided over his pleasant kingdom as Indra rules among the Devas, with tributary princes at his side, and surrounded by learned pundits, by minstrels with ready songs to sing, by droves of haughty nobles and by the sidelong glances of the charming ladies of his court. Of all the learned men at his court, however, none could compare with his Ayurvedic Vaidya, who shone for the simplicity and effectiveness of his diagnoses and the elegance of his strategies of treatment. He was able to ferret out the root of a disease, rather than getting caught up in the branches. And of all the beauties of his court, his daughter, the Princess, was the most charming—with her tremulous eyes darting and flashing like little minnows, her gazelle-like eyes dark as lotus blossoms, her poison, ambrosial eyes. She was golden limbed, and her midnight of hair was a flowing mass of thick, blossoming, iridescent darkness. She was adorned with star-like strands of pearls, her breath was fragrant as mango blossoms, and her voice as soft as liquefied moonlight. As a young woman at court she had already learned, in addition to the erotic arts, sixty-four auxiliary arts. To name just a few: singing, playing veena, dancing, painting, decorating her forehead, the art of adorning an idol with rice and flowers, flower arranging, bed making, garland weaving, the art of designing earrings and other ornaments, the art of mixing perfumes for the skin in order to stimulate desire, the art of dressing tastefully, magic and sleight of hand, cooking, the preparation of sherbets and other beverages, sewing, the solution of riddles, the art of reciting verses in a game between lovers, mimicry, reasoning and logic, chanting, fencing, carpentry, gardening, composing poems, the art of sizing up a man in a glance, and the art of teaching parrots to speak.The Raja commanded a great General, a bull among men who, had it not been a time of peace, would have been a mighty vanquisher of cities. He rivaled the Devas with the beauty of his person. Much to the Raja’s consternation, his daughter the Princess had fallen in love with the General. And the General—whose loyalty to the Raja was otherwise absolute, and whose skill with the bow could not be matched in all the earth—was pierced to the marrow with but one darting glance from the eye of the Princess. After that glance, he vowed to her—even against the Raja’s wishes—that even if he were to conquer all the earth, for him there would be only one city, and in that city only one house, and in that house only one room, and in that room only one bed, and in that bed only one woman—the Princess—who would eternally be the light of his life. He gazed long and lovingly at the beauty of her form and proclaimed to her that her breasts were like two rajas at war—each striving to invade the other’s sphere.Because her father, the Raja, had forbidden her to see him, she resisted the General’s words. But just as even a brave enemy army is overcome with storm clouds of arrows, the Princess was overcome with the monsoon power of the General’s unrelenting expressions. Soon, the battlements of her lips succumbed to his attacks, as in love’s contest she sank—sighing—beneath fiery wounds of nails and teeth, and might have died—save that she drank ambrosia from her lover’s lips—and joining forces with him bodily she fought passionately in his embrace to achieve together with him the victory of love’s battle.The treasure of this plundering was that the Princess one day discovered that she was with child. She did not know what to do. Holding her pet parrot to her lips she feigned it were her love, and whispered that she would give back all his kisses and embraces if only his seed were not growing within her womb. The pet parrot, in fact, had been chattering to the Queen, the mother of the Princess, for some weeks, repeating all the nightly love whisperings and sighs between the Princess and her lover the General—although the young Princess had striven to check the bird, fearful that her father, the Raja, would hear. And so it was that the Queen learned of her daughter’s pregnancy.Of course mother and daughter attempted to hide the fact from the Raja. Standing together on a white balcony, looking out at the billowing, dark blue monsoon clouds, they conspired together to ask the learned royal Vaidya to prepare an herbal potion that would cause a miscarriage—for otherwise the Raja would be enraged.The royal Vaidya heard their argument. And though even a scholarly man can be convinced by a strong argument, the Vaidya was not only a scholar, but also a physician of deep moral character. He could not destroy life. “You must!” the Queen commanded him.“I cannot,” the Vaidya replied. “Then you will suffer,” rejoined the Queen. And so it was that the Queen went to her husband, the Raja, and told him that the Vaidya had impregnated his daughter, the Princess. The Raja, outraged, ordered the Vaidya to be brought before him. And though the Raja pummeled him with questions and insults, and ordered him to be cast into prison, on a restricted diet, with only a tiny mattress to recline on, the Vaidya, who was a firm follower of Dharma, spoke only the following words:From all your herds, a half cup of milk,From all your granaries, a small piece of bread,In all your palace, only a dungeon’s bed,Can a man use more? And do you own the rest?The parrot, overhearing these words of the noble Vaidya, flew directly to the Princess, who was pining away as she listened to the cries of the peacocks. “What brings you here, my darling?” the Princess asked the bird.tThe bird, who rivaled Rig Veda pundits with his memory, repeated word for word the conversation between the Raja and the Vaidya. Upon hearing the words of the noble Vaidya, who had said nothing against herself or the Queen, the Princess began to feel pity and admiration for the Vaidya’s saintly qualities. She rushed to the Raja, her father, and told him all.tAnd so it was that the Raja and the Princess decided that the Vaidya should resume his duties, and that the child in the womb of the Princess should, himself, become a Vaidya. In order to prepare the mind of the young soul who would be her son, she traveled to that crest jewel of educational institutions, Nalanda, with its mango grove, scholars, and gardens—and took up the study of Ayurveda when the child was still in her womb. Because she was the Princess, the daughter of the great Raja who supported the university, all the senior Vaidyas strove to awaken within her heart the essence of Ayurveda. She—having already learned all the arts of a young lady at court—took up the study of Sankhya, herbology, pathology, diagnostics, and therapeutics—so that by the time the child was born, the very milk he drank from his mother’s breasts was replete with Ojas, the essence of Ayurvedic wisdom.tNalunda at that time was a magnificent center of intellectual debate that drew scholars from afar. It was a place where nit-picking Sankhyins debated with spaced-out Vedantins, no-nonsense Buddhists clashed with ethereal Hindus, dour Monists fought it out with pious Dualists, and austere Sadhus lectured love-eyed voluptuaries versed in the Kama Sutras. It was a place where some made lean matters fat and others made fat matters lean, where sharp debaters ripped apart conclusions, hypotheses and arguments of their opponents as savagely as vultures tearing apart a piece of rotting meat tossed into the air. And so it was here that—after reaching the age of sixteen—the son of the Princess had passed with highest honors all the questions of his examiners. He was, however, put to one final test: He was to wander the vast grounds of Nalunda and bring back to his examiners any herbs that were useless.tHe wandered far and wide. At first he went to the mango grove, where grew the King of Fruit. He knew the leaves of the mango tree could be used to treat diabetics, so he gave up searching there and searched in the forest. Everywhere he turned he found healing herbs. He returned to his examiners and, ashamed, admitted that he had failed: He could not find even one single plant in the vast domain of Nalanda’s verdant grounds that was not curative in some disorder.tIt so happened that Lord Buddha, himself, The Awakened One, had at that moment walked from the mango grove, and happened to be sitting with the examiners. He looked at the youth, whom he would name Jeevaka, and uttered these words:tNo single plant in the whole world’s garden plottBears such sweet fruit as the mind of an enlightened Vaidya tWho realizes there is no substance under the SuntWithout curative value. Ambrosial is the fruit of suchA Vaidya’s mind, and poison The fruit of a Vaiyda’s mindWho knows this not.And so it was that Jeevaka became the chief medical council of Lord Buddha, training all those monks who would travel to other lands spreading Buddhism and Ayurveda. Jeevaka also became a great surgeon, performing plastic surgery and even cranial surgery. However, because he was not a Brahmin, many of the other, high-born, Vaidyas became jealous of his high standing and even began to suffer from some subtle derangements of Pitta due to that jealousy. They convinced Lord Buddha that doing surgery was doing violence. Even the great alchemist and philosopher Nagarjuna became jealous of the young Jeevaka and joined the argument, and thus surgery was banned and later declined as an Ayurvedic science.This victory did not quench the jealousy of the lesser Vaidyas, however, because their knowledge, compared to Jeevaka’s, was merely like the light of the stars compared to the brilliance of the full moon. Thus they plotted with one Vaidya from Kerala in South India, who devised a test for Jeevaka. The Keralan Vaidya sent a messenger to walk the hundreds of miles from Kerala to Nalanda, bearing a written message to deliver to Jeevaka. In addition, the messenger was instructed that—while traveling—he was to eat tamarind pod, take a bath using tamarind leaves boiled in water, cook food with a tamarind wood fire, sleep under a tamarind tree at night, use tamarind stem to brush his teeth, gargle with tamarind leaf water every night, and use tamarind sticks for flossing his teeth. The messenger followed the instructions exactly, and it took months for him to reach Nalanda, where he handed the written message to Jeevaka. The message read:1.tHere is your patient.2.tGive him proper treatment.Jeevaka took the messenger’s pulse, examined his skin, tongue and eyes, and questioned him.It became obvious to Jeevaka that the messenger, through overuse of tamarind by all possible routes of administration, had developed eczema. Jeevaka considered the etiological factor, wrote a message for the Vaidya in Kerala to read, and instructed the messenger to walk back to Kerala—on the way eating one handful of tender neem leaves every morning, bathing every day using water boiled with neem leaves in it, cooking his food using a neem leaf fire, sleeping beneath the boughs of a neem tree every night, using neem stems to brush his teeth, gargling with neem leaf water every night before bed, and using neem sticks for flossing his teeth. The messenger arrived in Kerala and handed the Vaidya Jeevaka’s letter, which read: tYour messenger must be cured of eczema by now.

Organic Body Care Recipes

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4.02 rating

Comment 1: One of my many New Year Resolutions this year was to go organic. Be more green in every aspect in life. After researching all the negative impacts on commercial projects on my health, was the reason I wanted a change. Most of the chemicals in commercial can HURT you, possibly leading to cancer, infertility, and hormonal problems down the road. The skin absorbs the chemicals in shampoo, lotion, bath products, and everything else that comes in contact with it. Comment 2: A fun collection of body care recipes for total body pampering. I love the fact that these can be made with easy-to-find organic ingredients, and are not too complicated. We used some of the recipes in a recent girlfriends' get-together, and had a fabulous time making wonderful face cleansing creams, masks and scrubs that worked great, and looked so pretty in our little decorated jars and tins. Nice gift ideas for the favorite women in your life. Comment 3: A great book for people looking for chemical-free alternatives to mass-produced beauty products. If you have sensitive, easily irritated skin like me, or if you're looking for a fun weekend gift project, there are plenty of great recipes and ideas here. Can't wait to try the lip balm recipes, now that my favorite peppermint beeswax lip balm (I won't name names) significantly changed their recipe...

Walking the World in Wonder: A Children's Herbal

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4.33 rating

Comment 1: This does have good photos showing the plants, but not enough information that I'd be comfortable with identification. And I imagine that sometimes one really doesn't want to make a mistake. Comment 2: This is a wonderful intro to herbalism for adults as well as the children audience. A beautiful book, I highly recommend to/for anyone..

Culpeper's Complete Herbal

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4.06 rating

Comment 1: A truly remarkable book I have a PDF copy of 'Culpeper's Complete Herbal' from 1800 with its old fashioned English. No illustrations but a fascinating book none the less. One which encouraged me to seek out a modern day version and I was lucky enough to find this hardback copy from 1983 with it's beautiful illustrations. Comment 2: like this book as a history reference for herbs as I like to see what people used to do with what plant but as a modern herb reference book probably not, is a very nice book though Comment 3: I like this book. I have 2 copies. This one, bought at a book fair (Got to have a hardback of this book) and a paperback to flip through and mark when needed. Comment 4: Useful to those serious about learning about the wide-world of herbs. Love the colorful drawings. Tells where /when they can be found & past /present uses.

The Green Pharmacy

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4.16 rating

Comment 1: After an introduction chapter on how to use herbs, James Duke has compiled an extensive alphabetical listing of ailments and recommendations for herbal treatments. He includes everything from 'Asthma' to 'Diabetes' to 'Warts' to 'Constipation ' ... it is very comprehensive. There is repetition (garlic is an effective remedy for a lot of things), but the way it is set up makes the repetition helpful. The same remedy may be listed in 'Virus' and 'Tonsilitis', for example. Rather than reading the book front to back, I read the introduction, the conclusion, and then skimmed through the specific ailments. This book makes an excellent reference book to keep on the shelf to refer to as needed.The author explains clearly why these herbal remedies are so little used and known in the US. At the same time, I appreciate that he is not trying to fight against mainstream doctors. He recommends discussing any herbal treatments with your doctor.I would recommend reading the end of the book first. He talks about his background and how he grew to love working with medicinal plants. It helps you realize that he really may be one of the foremost authorities in the world. The writing is only a little 'preachy', and he comes across as a nice, easygoing guy.

UC Prescription for Herbal Healing: An Easy-to-Use A-Z Reference to Hundreds of Common Disorders andTheir Herbal Remedies

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4.12 rating

Comment 1: Excellent reference book for herbal practitioner. The first half of the book covers common medicinal plants with very useful information about usage and considerations. The second half of the book is organized alphabetically by common physical conditions, recommendations and considerations. Comment 2: Informative and really helps us to know and use the type of natural herbs and supplements for healing. This book also tells us the potential dangers of some herbs, the proper dosage, and the expected time frame in which we can expect to see the positive effects from using them. Comment 3: Great book. Easy to read format, with all the details you need. I'm always picking it up to look at something.

The Master Book of Herbalism

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4.33 rating

Comment 1: Before I was LDS I was wiccan and this book was just recently passed to me by my father. I love the information on herbs that it gives you. I don't use the other stuff in this book with magick but I love all the information and that is what I think is so great about this book is that you don't have to be wiccan just interested in herbs and it gives you a good informational understanding of them. Good read and don't let the pagan symbol fool you this is not just for pagan religions its for all th Comment 2: I loved this book. I'm going this weekend to buy some more plants because it's made me so happy. I learned a lot more about Herbalism and how to help further myself as a pagan. I'm a beginner and this was perfect. I needed something that could teach me some definitions and easy remedies. Not that they were all easy but it was a straight forward enough that I wasn't left in the dust trying to read in between the lines. I know this is a book sin; but my copy now has pen and highlighter all in it. Comment 3: I read this text for research purposes, but found it very interesting. I won't say I'm a believer, but the guide to the uses of herbs was very detailed and informative. If you, like me, can get over the archaic way "magic" is spelt all the way through, you will enjoy this book.

A Compendium of Herbal Magick

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4.19 rating

Every plant has its own distinct spiritual energy or its own deva. Devas are the radiant light of the Universal Divine which permeates all things. Since the earliest times people were aware that all of Nature is divine. Great and wondrous myths were told which explained the presence of divine energy as it exists in thunder, in trees and in sunlight. Some of this lore was the foundation of religions. But the simpler stories such as those of a plant's energy explored day-to-day matters like health and love. This understanding of the world has been preserved in folklore through poems, chants, ditties and spells. From researching the history of folklore from cultures around the world, patterns emerge which enable us to approach the true nature of plants' devas. This compendium presents the lore and the corresponding usage for 330 magickal herbs. Great care was taken only to include folklore that was documented as being authentic.You will meet many new herbs in this text and explore fascinating magickal and religious uses. But most of all we hope you come to respect the divine that surrounds your everyday life.

The Wicca Garden: A Modern Witch's Book of Magickal and Enchanted Herbs and Plants

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3.77 rating

Comment 1: A great resource for any Wiccan or magick-oriented person looking into the uses for plants and herbs. This book is very precise and consistent, and it provides a good list. It's biggest downside is that there are no pictures of the plants. Still, it contains a very organized reference.

Herb Magic for Beginners: Down-To-Earth Enchantments

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4.16 rating

Comment 1: I'm a complete novice with no experience. I've been put off so many other books because they assumed a certain level of experience or understanding that I simply don't have. This book was laid out in such a way that I didn't need any background knowledge - and so I was able to begin my education with it. Comment 2: Awesome little book with wonderful ideas for herbs to grow in my garden... I need to go order some seeds!

Garden Witch's Herbal: Green Magick, Herbalism & Spirituality

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4.12 rating

Comment 1: Ellen Dugan considers herself a garden/green witch, and so she uses a lot of plant material in her spells. She shares her knowledge, both horticultural and magickal in this volume. Comment 2: Perfect addition to any witch's library. Practical advice and suggestions for your garden no matter where you live. Easy to read. Easy to use. Comment 3: Interesting and easy to read for individuals wanting to learn or understand Herbalism and Spirituality,

The Natural Pregnancy Book: Herbs, Nutrition, and Other Holistic Choices

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4.1 rating

Reading The Natural Pregnancy Book is like having your own personal herbalist and midwife at your side. Expertly written by Aviva Jill Romm, who has been providing family-centered natural health care for almost twenty years, it guides women through treating the common ills and ailments of pregnancy simply with herbs and nutrition.Aviva thoughtfully follows the woman's journey from baby's conception to birth, describing herbs that can promote and maintain a healthy pregnancy, along with those you should avoid during your term. Her herbal remedies cover such familiar concerns as anxiety, fatigue, morning sickness, and stretch marks. She also discusses the components of a healthy diet, with an emphasis on natural foods. With its detailed information and comforting voice, The Natural Pregnancy Book is a complete primer for the woman who envisions a safe pregnancy as nature intended it.

Your Backyard Herb Garden: A Gardener's Guide to Growing Over 50 Herbs Plus How to Use Them in Cooking, Crafts, Companion Planting and More

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4.05 rating

Comment 1: This is a fabulous book if you are looking for more information on herb gardening and what to do with them one you've grown them. It has general and specific plant information, all kinds of helpful tables, and recipes for cooking, preserving, making shampoos and stuff, making insect repellants, doing arts and crafts, etc. I bought a rose scented geranium plant this spring to make rose scented geranium jelly with! Comment 2: Great book, not only for information about the use and benefits of different herbs, but also on planting propagation and spreading of herbs that you choose to grow on your own. Comment 3: Features some great lists like "Light Preferences of Herbs" (where, for example, you can see which herbs prefer shade) and "Herbs for a Windowsill." Comment 4: Full or two page entries per herb - photos, planting info, picking info. Basically everything you'd want to know, even garden layouts & recipes.

The Edible Herb Garden

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3.77 rating

Comment 1: I've read a lot of introductory herb garden books in my time, and this one is... pretty good for what it is. I wouldn't say it's exactly special, but it does concentrate on herbs you can use in cooking, and making some pretty gardens from them. (The pictures are very pretty-- the author works with Comment 2: A nice little book on the cultivation of herbs. It gives very little detail on any specific herb but offers adequate general knowledge for the beginner. Lovely pictures. I got the book from my library. I would not purchase it as it offered me no new information about herb cultivation. Comment 3: Good information on growing herbs. But would have liked more information, regarding harvesting, and recipes.

Herbal Healing for Women

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4.33 rating

Comment 1: I've got an older copy than this one, much loved and picked up in a second hand book store.Love anything by Rosemary Gladstar - her writing is really down to earth but her decades of experience as a practising herbalist and teacher of medicinal herbs shine through with specific information (the fine print) so you can apply it in a practical way.There is some really good information on herbal manufacturing in this book. I'm a professionally qualifed herbalist and make my own remedies up for my clients and Rosemary's recipes are pure gold. This book looks at herbs for women and breaks it down into herbs for young girls, for the childbearing years & menstrual problems, pregnancy & childbirth and menopause (in doing so, weaving in the ancient concept of the three faces of the goddess - the maiden, the mother and the crone). I consider this a reliable text book, not just another home herbal. More recipes for teas, tinctures, oils, salves, pills, capsules and linaments along with how and when to use them.Lovely illustrations.

Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year (Wise Woman Herbal Series, #1)

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4.33 rating

Comment 1: The Childbearing Year contains a wide range of resources for woman pertaining to their reproductive health. This information includes activities, foods, and herbal supplements that can benefit woman hoping to conceive, who are pregnant, or who have a newborn child. These topics range from increasing fertility health for better odds of becoming pregnant and things to stay away from to reduce the likelihood of miscarriage through safe remedies for morning sickness and ways to alleviate late pregnancy back ache to herbs that will reduce the intensity of post partum depression and safe remedies for colic. I recommend this book to any woman who is thinking of having a child, is pregnant, or has a newborn. Not only does this book give the reader a clear idea of activities, foods, and herbs that she can use for common reproductive related ailments but the author also explains the safest ways to use these remedies. Moreover, the author also includes foods and herbs that can actually make the situation worse or that can even be hazardous to the baby's health so that the reader is forewarned about such potential dangers. Comment 2: I really liked this book. I think the best advice, or the most used advice was the raspberry leaf tea. I've had a really healthy pregnancy and I'm approaching the point of getting my cervix ready for birth, so I'll definitely be digging this one out again. I do think she's a little too cautious, though. For instance, she recommends against flax, but gives no reason. I'm vegan, and it's essential for me to eat flax and to use flax oil for the Omegas it offers.

Healing Wise (Wise Woman Herbal Series)

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4.35 rating

Superb herbal in the feminine-intuitive mode. Complete instructions for using common plants for food, beauty, medicine, and longevity. Introduction by Jean Houston Healing Wise sets forth the foundations of the Wise Woman Tradition, contrasting them with the Heroic and Scientific views of healing. Weeds draw us into ancient wisdom in a clear and refreshing way, says herbalist Rosemary Gladstar. I see the Wise Woman. She carries a blanket of compassion. She wears a robe of wisdom. From her shoulders, a mantle of power flows. She ties the threads of our lives together. I see the Wise Woman. And she sees me. Seven herbs -- burdock, chickweed, dandelion, nettle, oatstraw, seaweed, and violet -- are explored in depth. Each monograph includes the voice of the herb, a weed walk to encounter the herb in its environment, detailed instructions for harvesting and preparation, properties and uses for every part of the herb, pertinent facts, fun folklore, and recipes for gourmet foodstuffs, wines, beers, cosmetics, and more.

Breast Cancer? Breast Health! The Wise Woman Way (Wise Woman Herbal Series, #4)

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4.46 rating

Designed to be a resource for both women who want to maintain breast health and those who've been diagnosed with breast cancer, Breast Cancer? Breast Health! The Wise Woman Way draws on "women's wisdom," or the inner knowledge often ignored by modern medicine, as a powerful tool for healing. Author Susun Weed proposes an anticancer lifestyle, and, if cancer does enter the picture, a six-step plan for healing (sleep is at zero, or "Do Nothing"; surgery is number six, which she terms "Break and Enter"), with various complementary healing techniques included throughout. Weed is careful to point out that supplements and herbs can hurt as much as they can help, and she lists several alternative-medicine techniques that should be avoided no matter what. The steps she does recommend--from herbal oils for breast massage to help detect lumps early to the herbs milk thistle, dandelion, and burdock for women with liver damage from tamoxifen--are explained clearly, sometimes with fascinating quotes from centuries-old books on healing. Weed will draw ire from some readers for recommending that mammograms be avoided. She says they tend to squeeze cancer cells into the bloodstream and can't detect cancer until it's metastatic, which are reasons enough to not have them, and adds that women would be better off by making her suggested anticancer lifestyle changes, paying more attention to their breasts, and performing regular self-exams. The warnings about the dangers of electromagnetic fields, exposure to estrogen, and organochlorides from plastics may frighten some, but Weed means to enlighten and empower. She dedicates the book to environmentalist and Silent Spring author Rachel Carson and poet Audre Lorde, who both died of breast cancer. Extensive herbal resources, a solid glossary, and a thorough index are included.

The Secret Teachings of Plants: The Intelligence of the Heart in the Direct Perception of Nature

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4.34 rating

Reveals the use of direct perception in understanding Nature, medicinal plants, and the healing of human disease• Explores the techniques used by indigenous and Western peoples to learn directly from the plants themselves, including those of Henry David Thoreau, Goethe, and Masanobu Fukuoka, author of The One Straw Revolution• Contains leading-edge information on the heart as an organ of perceptionAll ancient and indigenous peoples insisted their knowledge of plant medicines came from the plants themselves and not through trial-and-error experimentation. Less well known is that many Western peoples made this same assertion. There are, in fact, two modes of cognition available to all human beings--the brain-based linear and the heart-based holistic. The heart-centered mode of perception can be exceptionally accurate and detailed in its information gathering capacities if, as indigenous and ancient peoples asserted, the heart’s ability as an organ of perception is developed.Author Stephen Harrod Buhner explores this second mode of perception in great detail through the work of numerous remarkable people, from Luther Burbank, who cultivated the majority of food plants we now take for granted, to the great German poet and scientist Goethe and his studies of the metamorphosis of plants. Buhner explores the commonalities among these individuals in their approach to learning from the plant world and outlines the specific steps involved. Readers will gain the tools necessary to gather information directly from the heart of Nature, to directly learn the medicinal uses of plants, to engage in diagnosis of disease, and to understand the soul-making process that such deep connection with the world engenders.

The Protocol School of Washington Tea & Etiquette: Taking Tea for Business and Pleasure

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4.03 rating

Comment 1: While I found some of the information in this book to be helpful, overall I just found myself getting increasingly annoyed reading this book. It seemed to me that the author had a real bee in her bonnet and I didn't really like her voice or tone in the book. Though, that may have been my own bee in my bonnet. I don't think this is a book I would recommend. Comment 2: This book has some great info about tea and etiquette as expected. However Chapter Two, favorite tea stories should have been called "Name dropping 101" and should have been relegated to the back of the book. Aside from that it was worth the read. There are even recipes included for those interested.

The Herbal Medicine-Maker's Handbook: A Home Manual

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4.39 rating

THE HERBAL MEDICINE-MAKER'¬?S HANDBOOK is an entertaining compilation of natural home remedies written by one of the great herbalists, James Green, author of the best-selling THE MALE HERBAL. Writing in a delightfully personal and down-home style, Green emphasizes the point that herbal medicine-making is fundamental to every culture on the planet and is accessible to everyone. So, first head into the garden and learn to harvest your own herbs, and then head into your kitchen and whip up a batch of raspberry cough syrup, or perhaps a soothing elixir to erase the daily stresses of modern life.

Encyclopedia of Essential Oils: The complete guide to the use of aromatic oils in aromatherapy, herbalism, health and well-being

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4.1 rating

Comment 1: This illustrated encyclopedia is wonderful. I particularly enjoy the photos and sketches of the plants and the photos of the color of the essential oils. This adds a wealth of information that is not available in other texts. This book is in three parts: An Introduction to Aromatics, Therapeutic Index and The Oils. The first section gives the reader and introduction to aromatherapy including history and how essential oils work with the systems of the body. There is a wealth of information and each topic is briefly covered, with references. The second section gives a therapeutic index grouped by systems of the body, with an abbreviation guide for suggested applications. The final section covers 165 essential oils. This is the most fascinating to me. It includes color photos and sketches with a description of the leaves, fruits and other plant material. We also receive a brief description of herbal and folk tradition, aromatherapy/home use, other uses, distribution and other species information. This section is the main reason I enjoyed this book so much. Overall, I would recommend this book for readers who love aromatherapy and want to learn more about particular essential oils. I also feel it's important to have other more recently written and published essential oils books to cross reference with for updated safety information. I have ISBN 1-85230-661-0 from Element Books, Inc. 1997.

The Complete Herbal Guide: A Natural Approach to Healing the Body

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3.91 rating

Comment 1: I love how this kindle book has a nice clickable Table of Contents to find specific ailments as well as herbal remedies! Nearly 800 pages of well written, concise, useful information! One of the other things that I highly appreciated was how the author tells you.. how prescription medications may or may not work with various herbal remedies! For example.. if you're taking a blood thinner medication that was prescribed by your physician.. you probably do not want to also take licorice root in tan

The Herb Bible

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3.7 rating

Comment 1: An excellent resource to have at your fingertips...the only real complaint I had was that they listed them alphabetically by their proper names, making it harder for the layman to follow. Good information though, especially for a beginner in herblore. Comment 2: although decent, anything calling itself a _____ "bible" like the actual bible. leaves something to be desired and then you research further and realize that it left out a bunch of information.

Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner's Guide

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4.46 rating

Comment 1: A wonderful beginner's guide to medicinal herbs. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and love how it sets out to dispel any negative feelings about growing, using and integrating into yours and your family's everyday life. I also greatly appreciate the simple breakdown on how to make your own tea blend, syrups, salves and tinctures. This book also contains a plethora of "recipes" to assist with everyday problems such as cold related coughing, allergies, relaxation aids, digestive aids, acne treatmen Comment 2: Herbalism doesn't have to be complicated and scary. Rosemary's advice is to start with just a few herbs - ones you know well, that grow near you. In this book she talks about growing and using such common garden sights as yarrow, St. John's Wort, dandelion, and basil. Basic, easy-to-understand directions for the common preparations are included right up front - tincture, salve, infusion, decoction, poultice - all in plain, non-technical language. Rosemary's signature wise-elder style comes throu Comment 3: Really awesome introduction to herbalism. Herb books are going to be a little earthy-crunchy by nature, but Rosemary is an OG and doesn't waste time rambling. She jumps right in with basic guides on what differentiates decoctions, teas, tinctures, syrups, salves, etc and how to prepare these and more. The book is broken down plant-by-plant, with recipes and tips included in each chapter, which makes it really intuitive as a straight read or reference book. I'll certainly be using it as the latte

Rosemary Gladstar's Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health: 175 Teas, Tonics, Oils, Salves, Tinctures, and Other Natural Remedies for the Entire Family

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4.51 rating

Comment 1: This book is an amazing asset to any household - from beginners to experienced herbalists. As a mother, I take very seriously my responsibilty to tend to the health and wellness of my family. I got this book when I was just beginning to learn about herbs and natural health. At first, all of the recipes look a little daunting. But if you just slow down and pick a few to try based on your individual needs, you will see how easy they are to use/make and will gain confidence to try others. With the Comment 2: I finally finished reading this one after several years of having this book (this was one of my books that I read most of, and is one of the main herbalism books I use for reference, and have probably read most of it in sections at different times, but never from cover to cover, so missed a few sections here and there but I finally finished it cover to cover). I love this book, I have been using it for years (it is very well researched and contains many recipes and has safety information in it) Comment 3: Amazing book. As a beginner with making my own, homemade remedies, this was a perfect collection of recipes and instruction, complete with color pictures and fabulous reference material. I have a slew of tabs marking favorite recipes using local flora, and I expect this book will get a lot of use in the years to come. I cannot recommend this book highly enough for the beginner, or even the more experienced person looking for a solid addition to their reference material.

A Modern Herbal

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4.39 rating

Medical Herbalism: The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine

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4.44 rating

A foundational textbook on the scientific principles of therapeutic herbalism and their application in medicine• A complete handbook for the medical practitioner• Includes the most up-to-date information on preparations, dosage, and contraindications• By the author of The Complete Illustrated Holistic HerbalMedical Herbalism contains comprehensive information concerning the identification and use of medicinal plants by chemical structure and physiological effect, the art and science of making herbal medicine, the limitations and potential of viewing herbs chemically, and the challenge to current research paradigms posed by complex plant medicines. It also includes information on toxicology and contraindications, the issues involved in determining dosage and formulation types for an individual, guides to the different measurement systems and conversion tables, and the pros and cons of both industrial and traditional techniques.With additional sections devoted to the principles of green medicine, the history of Western Herbalism, the variety of other medical modalities using medicinal plants, an extensive resource directory, and a discussion of treatments organized by body system, Medical Herbalism is the comprehensive textbook all students and practitioners of clinical herbalism need to develop their healing practices.

Sacred Plant Medicine: The Wisdom in Native American Herbalism

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4.27 rating

The first in-depth examination of the sacred underpinnings of the world of Native American medicinal herbalism.❧ Reveals how shamans and healers talk with plants to discover their medicinal properties❧ Includes the prayers and medicine songs associated with each of the plants examined❧ By the author of The Secret Teachings of PlantsAs humans evolved on Earth they used plants for everything imaginable--food, weapons, baskets, clothes, shelter, and medicine. Indigenous peoples the world over have been able to gather knowledge of plant uses by communicating directly with plants and honoring the sacred relationship between themselves and the plant world. In Sacred Plant Medicine Stephen Harrod Buhner looks at the long-standing relationship between indigenous peoples and plants and examines the techniques and states of mind these cultures use to communicate with the plant world. He explores the sacred dimension of plant and human interactions and the territory where plants are an expression of Spirit. For each healing plant described in the book, Buhner presents medicinal uses, preparatory guidelines, and ceremonial elements such as prayers and medicine songs associated with its use.

The Way of Herbs

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4.16 rating

Fully updated with the latest developments in herbal science, this book provides an essential guide to gaining and maintaining good health through a holistic approach.

Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief

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4.45 rating

The definitive guide to adaptogenic herbs, formerly known as “tonics,” that counter the effects of age and stress on the body • Reveals how adaptogens increase the body’s resistance to adverse influences • Provides a history of the use of these herbal remedies and the actions, properties, preparation, and dosage for each herb We all deal with stress every day, and every day our bodies strive to adapt and stay balanced and healthy. In Adaptogens, authors David Winston and Steven Maimes provide a comprehensive look into adaptogens, non-toxic herbs such as ginseng, eleuthero, and licorice, that produce a defensive response to stress in our bodies. Formerly known as rejuvenating herbs or tonics, adaptogens help the body to “adapt” to the many influences it encounters. They increase stamina and counter the normal effects of aging and thus are becoming important tools in sports medicine and in the prevention and treatment of chronic fatigue and other stress-related disorders. Winston and Maimes present the historical uses of these herbal remedies in India, Russia, China, and the Americas and explain how they work and why they are so effective at combating stress-induced illness. Monographs for each adaptogen also present the latest scientific research and include the origin, traditional use, actions, properties, preparation, and dosage for each herb.

Botany in a Day: Thomas J. Elpel's Herbal Field Guide to Plant Families

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4.34 rating

A comprehensive reference to more than 100 plant families and over 700 genera of North American plants, Botany in a Day provides simple, easily learned tools to assist in plant identification. Line drawings highlight family characteristics, and plant entries discuss medicinal uses, edibility, toxicity, and look-alike plants. A standard reference at herbal and wilderness schools across the country, this resource is essential for herbalists, gardeners, and naturalists.

The Complete Illustrated Holistic Herbal: Safe and Practical Guide to Making and Using Herbal Remedies

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4.22 rating

Comment 1: Practical and hands on approach to a herbal this book is divided into 5 main sections:1. Holistic approach looking at herbs and health and prevention of disease2. Practical herbalism - good guide to gathering and preparing herbal remedies. Goes into chemistry and action of herbs and has a brief theraputic index (listing ailments and what herbs can be used).3. Herb index - illustrated with clear and large photos eahc entry briefly describes what the herb is used for, prts used, collection, constituents and how it acts. Also useful highlight boxes on how to prepare the herb and what dosage is appropriate as well as what it can be used in combination with and warnings!4. Bodily systems - examines each of the main bodily systems and how herbs can be used to strengthen and treat them.5. Reference section on useful contacts etc

Herbs and Things: A Compendium of Practical and Exotic Lore

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4.06 rating

Comment 1: This book was published in 1972 by someone I can only describe as a slightly psychotic hippie. The book starts out nicely enough with a long list of herbs and what they're useful for. She uses little drawings of some strange partying naked person to depict how poisonous or hallucinogenic some herbs are. It soon becomes obvious to the reader that the author has submitted twice as much information for hallucinogenic herbs as for others. The book contains several interesting recipes for cooking wit Comment 2: I picked up this book from the free bin at work, always looking to expand my herbal knowledge. but this book is not okay or useful at all. I get that it's old but i'm pretty sure it's also completely un-edited by anyone with any actual experience in herbal medicine because it's full of a lot of really dangerous and honestly just plain stupid ideas. this book insists that douching is vital to womens' health which we know now is the opposite of reality and i would be willing to accept that as "hin Comment 3: From another time... delightful relic though I wouldn't rely too much on it for actual medical advice.

Rosemary Gladstar's Family Herbal: A Guide to Living Life with Energy, Health, and Vitality

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4.59 rating

Considered the mother of modern herbalism in North America, Rosemary Gladstar has inspired an entire generation of herbalists and has been a driving force in herbal education. Now everyone can share in her wisdom and enthusiasm with this practical yet evocative compendium. It offers easy-to-understand information for achieving optimal health, as well as tried-and-true advice for feeling positive and energetic - naturally. Gladstar offers intensely personal and uplifting insights into her own life and the lives of her mentors and friends, giving readers a cross-generational guide to living life with true and boundless enthusiasm. Her herbal recipes address everyday ailments, ease stress and anxiety, and promote radiant beauty within and without while nurturing longevity and well-being throughout the life cycle. An herbal apothecary at the end of the book provides an A-to-Z guide to herbs and their healing uses, along with safety precautions, dosage information, and guidelines for when to seek traditional medical help.

The School of Natural Healing: The Reference Volume on Natural Herbs for the Teacher, Student or Herbal Practitioner

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4.76 rating

Christopher Publications is proud to offer this 25th Anniversary Edition of School of Natural Healing. Over the years, beginners and herbal practitioners have trusted School of Natural Healing to provide expert instruction on herbal therapy. The worldwide distribution and use of Dr. Christopher's formulas confirms the success and safety of his methods. If you have ever used an herbal combination, it was most likely one of Dr. Christopher's. This text combines his methods and famous formulas in an easy-to-use volume for personal and classroom study. Expanded and revised, we present this work, assured that it will enhance your efforts in natural healing. This edition offers: In depth study of over 110 including: Latin and Common Names, Botanical Descriptions, Medicinal Usage and Therapeutic Action, Preparation, Dosage, and Administration, Multiple Formulations for Each Herb, Case Histories, and Horticulture and Storage Information Other features include: Symptoms, Causes, and Natural Treatment for Over 80 Disease Conditions, Nutrition and Recipes for Vitality, Internal Cleansing and Purification, and Therapeutics for Over 1000 Herbs. Simplified and comprehensive index listing: Latin and Common Names, All Herbal Formulas, Health Conditions, Etc. Features new to this edition include: Recipes for All of Dr. Christopher's Formulas, A Biography of Dr. Christopher from An Herbal Legacy of Courage, and Quick-To Find Herb and Medicinal Action Heading on Each Page.

A Modern Herbal, Vol. II

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4.39 rating

"There is not one page of this enchanting book which does not contain something to interest the common reader as well as the serious student. Regarded simply as a history of flowers, it adds to the joys of the country." — B. E. Todd, Spectator.If you want to know how pleurisy root, lungwort, and abscess root got their names, how poison ivy used to treat rheumatism, or how garlic guarded against the Bubonic Plague, consult A Modern Herbal. This 20th-century version of the medieval Herbal is as rich in scientific fact and folklore as its predecessors and is equally encyclopedic in coverage. From aconite to zedoary, not an herb, grass, fungus, shrub or tree is overlooked; and strange and wonderful discoveries about even the most common of plants await the reader.Traditionally, an herbal combined the folk beliefs and tales about plants, the medicinal properties (and parts used) of the herbs, and their botanical classification. But Mrs. Grieve has extended and enlarged the tradition; her coverage of asafetida, bearberry, broom, chamomile, chickweed, dandelion, dock, elecampane, almond, eyebright, fenugreek, moss, fern, figwort, gentian, Hart's tongue, indigo, acacia, jaborandi, kava kava, lavender, pimpernel, rhubarb, squill, sage, thyme, sarsaparilla, unicorn root, valerian, woundwort, yew, etc. — more than 800 varieties in all — includes in addition methods of cultivation; the chemical constituents, dosages, and preparations of extracts and tinctures, unknown to earlier herbalists; possible economic and cosmetic properties, and detailed illustrations, from root to bud, of 161 plants.Of the many exceptional plants covered in Herbal, perhaps the most fascinating are the poisonous varieties — hemlock, poison oak, aconite, etc. — whose poisons, in certain cases, serve medical purposes and whose antidotes (if known) are given in detail. And of the many unique features, perhaps the most interesting are the hundreds of recipes and instructions for making ointments, lotions, sauces, wines, and fruit brandies like bilberry and carrot jam, elderberry and mint vinegar, sagina sauce, and cucumber lotion for sunburn; and the hundreds of prescriptions for tonics and liniments for bronchitis, arthritis, dropsy, jaundice, nervous tension, skin disease, and other ailments. 96 plates, 161 illustrations.

Planetary Herbology

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4.19 rating

Comment 1: (also on my site The Paperback Stash)I had always eyed this book, and now wish I had broken down and bought it earlier. Tierra has put so much information in these pages its breathtaking, a wonderful way to blend Ayurveda, TCM, and Western herbalism. With the popularity of the internet and with herbalists exploring different cultures and enjoying different aspects of various paths, this book should become a welcome addition to libraries everywhere. Tierra digs into the background of all three branches, breaking down the basics of each area of thought, including more than 400 herbs and their details. It gives Western herbalists another way to view herbs and their actions, which makes the book worth it on its own. One of the very best out there, it blends TCM, Ayurveda, and Western flawlessly; chocked to the brim with information, priceless and worth every cent!With all lined up beside each other in "The Nature of herbs", it's easier to see similarities between each. If you're in the market for a book that enables you to accurately learn about an herb in whichever culture, this is the one to go to. Tierra and his wife, Leslie, run a school that teaches the same principle of thought called the 'East West School of Herbology'.

The Complete Medicinal Herbal

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4.26 rating

Comment 1: Oh I was so excited to get this! I had heard so much about The Complete Medicinal Herbal by Penelope Ody that I had to order it for myself. This amazing book is a library in itself! Filled with beautiful color photographs of all the herbal plants and their parts so you can easily identify plants;along with the uses of each part of the plant;how to make tonics;the history of herbal medicines;making essential oils;making poultices,creams and so much more!You’ll find more than 250 remedies for common ailments;and how to make a herbal first aid kit!This really is the bible of herbal medicine!Once thought to be considered a sign of those who practiced witchcraft,more and more of those in the professional field of healing are turning back to once again using medicinal herbs. A skill highly regarded in the Eastern cultures,medicinal herbs have continued to grow in popularity since the 1960′s here in the US.I don’t think you’ll find anyone more knowledgeable in herbal medicines than Penelope Ody who has studied in China and England and practices as a professional medical herbalist in England and writes for several publications on the subject.I highly recommend this book for your home library or preparedness library. It’s a necessity for all of us who desire to be prepared for any emergency. Learn to identify the best plants and which plants to grow in your garden to have on hand for your family’s specific needs. This is a treasure!

Herbal Antibiotics, 2nd Edition: Natural Alternatives for Treating Drug-resistant Bacteria

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4.36 rating

Comment 1: Please, stop taking antibiotics that are not absolutely necessary! If you are not already completely freaked out by antibiotic resistant superbugs, you will be after reading this! However, this book is filled with up to date information on the advances in comprehensive herbal medicine that can battle those deadly bacteria. Everyone should own a copy! Our health, the health of our children and the health of our planet depend upon it! Comment 2: So glad that I have this secret weapon on my bookshelves..... fascinating read and I learned a GREAT deal! Some of the alternative I had known about and some of them were new to me. Luke has never, ever had to take antibiotics and although I would not hesitate to give them to him if they were TRULY needed, this book has given me the confidence to keep doing what I've always done - trying natural alternatives first! Comment 3: Reading this got me thinking of The Walking Dead: the Naturopathic version would be antibiotic / antiviral resistance gone crazy, the Zombies are the artifact of some pharmaceutical intervention and Rick Grimes is a cop searching for a herbalist. Ok, Hollywood's not going to be picking up my pitch anytime soon but reading this book, it has an apocalyptic undertone.

Homegrown Herbs: Gardening Techniques, Recipes, and Remedies for Growing and Using 101 Herbs

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4.28 rating

Comment 1: Great reference for someone interested in using herbs medicinally, but isn't really sure where to start. The descriptions of the 101 herbs along with the best places and times to plant them and the best uses for them is certainly the most helpful part of the book. The basic gardening and harvesting advice and the recipes for use of medicinal herbs in food were a nice addition, as well. My only complaint would be that, at times, the author leans toward either oversimplified explanations or the as Comment 2: I currently have checked out from library. I like it for the beautiful photos and all the useful suggestions, good inspiration. Also helping me to see what grows best in my soil, which has a lot of clay. Comment 3: This is a really cool reference book for growing herbs. It talks about how to design the garden, how to care for the plants, and how to use them. Comment 4: It is hard to imagine a more concise, enlightened or creative approach to the art, science and spirituality of herb gardening than

The Healing Herbs: The Ultimate Guide To The Curative Power Of Nature's Medicines

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4.09 rating

The Healing Herbs provides the information you need to use the earth's wonderful bounty of medicinal plants confidently, effectively, and above all, safely. It examines 100 of the most widely used, most easily available, most familiar, and most fascinating medicinal plants, tracing their history, folklore, and healing properties, and summarizing the latest scientific research on their many benefits. The Healing Herbs also explains where to find the herbs, how to take them, store and prepare them, even how to grow them. The Healing Herbs also includes an easy-to-use A-to-Z herb encyclopedia, plus a section titled Prevention and Treatment: A Fast-action Guide to Using the Healing Herbs, including: Conditions--from ear infection to stress, A-to-Z conditions and the herbs you can use to treat and prevent specific symptoms and diseases; Healing Actions--from antibiotic to sedative, an A-to-Z list of medicinal uses with herbs as a natural alternative to certain medicines; Other Uses--some unusual uses for the healing herbs, for example as insect repellent or memory improvement. Both Conditions and Healing Actions include special precautions about certain herbs, whether in preparation, long-term use, or short-term effects.

Be Your Own Herbalist: Essential Herbs for Health, Beauty, and Cooking

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4.1 rating

Comment 1: I don't usually even write reviews for books that I don't like, this is a rare exception. I was tempted to give this one star but there is some good information in the book, it's just that there are already so many better books out there and I didn't like the writing (or perhaps editing) style.

The Herbalist

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4.3 rating

This longtime best-selling book about herbs and their uses is now available in a newly revised and updated edition. It explains where different herbs grow; how to gather and prepare them; their medicinal values; and how to use them. Additional information has been added on beverage teas, spices and flavoring herbs, plant vitamins, plant dyes for fabrics, botanicals for dentifrices, gargles and cosmetics. Clear-cut illustrations of plants are found throughout the text and 291 plants are illustrated in full color.

The Earthwise Herbal: A Complete Guide to Old World Medicinal Plants

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4.47 rating

Comment 1: So good! great intro to how to use herbs clinically and then a wonderful materia medica (list of herbs, uses and energetics). What makes every one of Matthew Wood's books great is that he is a story teller and that he brings a real homie and energetic perspective to his books! This one is for you Annie! Comment 2: I like Matthew's blend of historical, researched uses and his own uses. I like that he focuses the first part of the book on the body, ways of diagnosing, and the description of properties that the body may be exhibiting - based on various methods. Comment 3: This book is a valuable resource for traditional usage of herbs. I love the way it is laid out so that all the information on the plant and its uses is in the same section. Comment 4: This book is a has to have with the New World edition. One of my favourite writers with lots of interesting information.

Dian Dincin Buchman's Herbal Medicine: The Natural Way to Get Well and Stay Well : Illustrated by Lauren Jarrett.

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3.94 rating

Classic bestselling book on herbs, now completely revised and updated to include all the latest information and discoveries in the world of herbs. Learn how to use herbs to relieve headaches, flu, alleviate muscle pain, stop allergies and change the way you look and feel. And see why this book has sold over 220,000 copies.

Rodale's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs

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4.19 rating

Rodale's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs is a virtually endless source of useful information and herbal know-how. Presented in A-to-Z format, supplemented with easy-to-use charts and lists, beautifully illustrated with drawings and color photographs, it is the only book on herbs you ever need to buy.

The New Holistic Herbal (Health workbooks)

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4.22 rating

The most authoritative practical guide to the use of herbal remedies in healing. Superbly illustrated. A must for every health library.

Home Herbal

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3.91 rating

"This profusely illustrated guide is packed with information, creating a real 'visual dictionary' of herbal remedies. "--Library Journal

Complete Book of Herbs and Spices

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4.2 rating

Relying on carefully detailed artist's representations of herbs as well as sun-drenched photography, Sarah Garland's attractive and thorough book begins with a hundred-page "Modern Herbal" with description, cultivation directions and various uses and goes on to chapters describing the herbl garden, cooking with herbs, household uses, cosmetics and medications.

Herbs

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4.05 rating

Comment 1: This is a great read with so much knowledge shared in such a fun and easy fashion . for basic health education it is great giving historical information about how the people of previous generations used natures wealth to heal themselves. As a writer I also enjoyed all the different dangers that I could use in writing . A great read, I highly recommend this book. Comment 2: Although it's not the most definitive reference for a budding herbalist, visual learners will very much appreciate the beautiful photographs of each herb, shrub and tree. Not only do they show one photograph, but usually a few of each part, and of different subspecies, as well as a traditional hand drawn picture of what the entire plant looks like. Comment 3: Great handbook for every gardener. I keep it on my nightstand to refer back to it again and again. Great photos and details of more than 700 species.

The Book of Herbal Wisdom: Using Plants as Medicines

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4.53 rating

Matthew Wood is recognized world wide as one of the United States' most reknown herbalists. His previous book, Seven Herbs: Plants as Healers, was a watershed in teaching herbal healing as a part of total wellness. In The Book of Herbal Wisdom, this is continued and enlarged in wonderful detail. This is a must-read for anyone working in the natural health field or interested in self healing with herbs. For those of us who consider not only our physical relationships to the herbs, but also the metaphysical ones, this book is invaluable. It affirms that when we work closely with nature, and the energies of the herbs and herbal medicine, we all are much better off. This is a work that empowers the reader and gives them a very deep knowledge of the herbs discussed.

The Encyclopedia of Herbs and Herbalism

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4 rating

Comment 1: Very good herbals split into 7 main section:1. History of herbalism2. Biology and chemistry of plants3. Medicinal uses of plants4. Herbs in the kitchen5. Domestic and cosmetic uses of herbs6. Cultivation and preservation of herbs7. A-Z of herbs illustrated with monochrome line drawings & photosIntroductory sections very thorough in history and biology. Lots of useful recipes in sections 3-5.Cultivation section has both garden designs and lists of hers suitable for specific situations plus excellent table summarising habit, soil and position requirements, how to propagate and when to harvest.

The New Age Herbalist: How to Use Herbs for Healing, Nutrition, Body Care, and Relaxation

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4.2 rating

We have all grown increasingly aware of the potential -- and documented -- dangers of the chemical toxins that surround us. "The New Age Herbalist" is a compendium of healthy alternatives, an indispensable guide for contemporary natural living. Created by a team of experts, it offers: A full-color illustrated glossary of more than 200 herbs, describing their properties, active ingredients, and traditional uses around the worldA guide to using herbs for scent, for decoration, and even as chemical-free housekeeping aidsTips on using herbs for skin care and beauty, by making natural shampoos, lotions, soaps, and cosmeticsA review of culinary herbs, with some unusual recipes that use familiar herbs in delightful new waysAn examination of the growing science of herbal healing, discussing herbal remedies -- including stress relievers -- and the scientific research that validates themA complete herb gardening plan, with advice on choosing symbiotic herbs, designing and scheduling plantings, and preserving the harvest by freezing and dryingFascinating, authoritative, packed with information presented in a stunning visual style, "The New Age Herbalist" will be the home herb user's bible for years to come.

The Herbal or General History of Plants

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4.37 rating

Comment 1: This is a lovely reference book particularly if you have a bit of a garden and are growing your own plants.Gerard was an Elizabethan herbalist and gives a description of each plant described, along with notes on when and where they grow and flower, various names and best of all their virtues which details how they can be used.Because Gerard wrote his book in the late 16th century it includes not only old favourites among plants like foxglove, cucumber (or cowcumber) and oats but also new and exciting plant like Tulips and the potato.Although taking your medical advice from 16th century herbals probably is not the best idea, "The herb chewed and held in the mouth, bringeth mightily from the braine slimie flegme like Pellitorie of Spain" is closer to my idea of an ideal outcome when suffering from a cold rather than the meek promise of decongestion promised by modern over the counter medicines.The description of violets is particularly fine: "...yea gardens themselves receive by these the greatest ornament of all, chiefest beauty, and most excellent grace, and the recreation of the minde which is taken hereby cannot be but very good and honest; for they admonish and stirre up a man to that which is comely and honest; for floures through their beauty, variety of colour, and exquisit forme, do bring to a liberall and gentle manly minde, the remembrance of honestie, comlinesse, and all kindes of vertues: for it would be an unseemly and filthy thing (as a wise man saith) for him that doth looke upon and handle faire and beautiful things, to have his mind not faire, but filthy and deformed."

The Herbal Arts

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4.14 rating

Nature's storehouse includes herbs that uplift, beautify, flavor, and heal. The Herbal Arts explores over one hundred of these plants with practicality, ease of use, and accessibility in mind. Besides a complete how-to section, its pages are filled with herb lore and multicultural histories, aromatic culinary and craft hints, health and home applications, and gardening tips, along with spiritual insights. Thus, this comprehensive volume serves body, mind, and soul, and increases the reader's appreciation of nature's gifts to us.Whether one grows his or her own herbs or buys them at the supermarket, The Herbal Arts blossoms with ideas and insights, as it explores herbalism's marvelous global traditions and history as well as modern expressions of this ancient art.Learning these herbal techniques can save readers money on flavored oils, soaps, creams, and even pet care! Better still, all the recipes are earth friendly, conservation minded, and spiritually fulfilling.

Welsh Herbal Medicine

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3.25 rating

Comment 1: I 'say' read, it's more of a flick through for general interest book, or as and when needed. Easy to read, well laid out and I recommend this book to anyone who may have an interest in such things :)

A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants and Herbs

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4.32 rating

Of Eastern and Central North America (Peterson Field Guides (R))The second edition of this volume shows how to identify more than 500 kinds of healing plants. More than 300 color photos illustrate the plants, their flowers, leaves, and fruits. The descriptive text includes information on where the plants are found as well as their known medicinal uses. An index to medical topics is helpful for quickly locating information on specific ailments from asthma and headaches to colds and stomach aches. Symbols next to plant descriptions provide quick visual caution for plants that are poisonous or cause allergic reactions. Organized by plant color for fast identification, this guide is a tool for understanding the traditional medicinal uses of the plants around us.

Back to Eden: American Herbs for Pleasure and Health: Natural Nutrition with Recipes and Instruction for Living the Edenic Life

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4.16 rating

Now in its expanded, updated revised edition, this is the original classic text (with more than 5-million copies sold) that helped create the natural foods industry. It remains today one of the major texts on herbs, natural diet and lifestyle and wholistic health.

Plant Spirit Medicine: The Healing Power of Plants

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4.24 rating

Ancient shamanic practice compelled the magician-healer to first make contact with the spirit of the plant to ask for its help before administering the herbal cure. This practice is still alive today in Mexico, among the traditional Indian shaman healers -- principally the elder Huichol Indian shaman and plant spirit healer, Don Guadalupe Gonzales Rios. Elliot Cowan reveals these ancient practices and guides the reader in the effective use of the wild herb plants in the area in which he or she lives. The result is a wonderful psychic and spiritual approach to holistic healing.

Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs

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4.3 rating

Comment 1: This may very well be a book I buy. Not only is this a solid magical herbalism encyclopedia, but once again, Cunningham has written a guide that is at once inclusive and specific. His introduction is really spot-on and I love that he leaves in some of the less practical rituals to "spark the imagination." My only real issues with this volume are (a) his use of gender in dealing with the properties of the plants (of course, this could easily be ignored by a practitioner that doesn't cotton to suc Comment 2: Cunningham's encyclopedia is certainly comprehensive, and the ability to search by common name, scientific name, or magical use is incredibly useful. But the book is severely lacking in explanations - his bibliograohy spans nearly 2,000 years, from ancient Greek medicine to medieval superstition to modern medicinal uses, all of which are incorporated into a plant's list of magical uses and affinities, but without a hint as to which sources are involved in a given claim. In short, the book functi Comment 3: I've realized that my expectations for what I want n an herbal, and what is actually out there, are two completely different things. Yet Cunningham's Encyclopedia has more of what I would want, with some folk history of the different herbs. I don't like that everything is structured into the generic Greek 4 element model, but you get that with Wicca and ceremonialism. As a supplemental reference book, I feel it does pretty well, and it did spark my interest into herbalism.

Earl Mindell's New Herb Bible

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3.95 rating

Comment 1: Also posted on my site The Paperback StashEarl Mindell's New Herb bible was one of the first books I bought on herbs. While this book is useful as a reference, it is in no way a definitive source that should be called a 'bible.' The writing is well done and simple, and the text and information aimed more toward a beginner in every sense of the word.Mindell is more of a supplement expert, and it does show from time to time here. Some of his comments gave me pause though. For instance, he says "Homeopathic extracts used by homepathic practitioners are much stronger than conventional herbal tinctures and are strictly regulated by the FDA. They should only be used in conjunction with treatment by a homeopath practitioner." This threw me a bit, I'll admit it.He goes on to say that herbal powders are common, yet does not mention that powdered herbs lose potency amazingly fast. When he said bitters can be nasty tasting and that some may prefer them in capsules, it's also left out that when you don't taste a bitter on the tongue, you don't get the effect, which is the point of taking a bitter. He also discusses Hippocrates as the father of modern medicine, a slight peeve of mine but no fault of the authors.Chapter 2 is the point of the book - the 'hot hundred' Here Mindell discusses briefly 100 herbs. Some have one paragraph, others have six, with a listing of possible benefits, then how to use it, then cautions if applicable. As a quick reference for the beginner this is useful; however, it's also quite vague. Many can sit and say what an herb has been historically used for, what evidence may or may not show (using these words), but I never got the feel he put much faith into the herbs themselves.Some of the cautions are a bit overdone as well, such as not to use blue cohosh because it could be toxic in high doses. Well....lots of things are toxic if overdosed on, does this mean we shouldn't use them in the right amount? On Cayenne pepper he states that people with gastrointestinal problems should not take cayenne and that you should be careful on the dose. Actually cayenne has shown much benefit in treating several gastrointestinal disorders and even if it feels hot going down, does not do damage or harm (or heat impact) internally. As to it causing kidney damage in high dosages? Never heard of this either.However, this is not to say he is overly cautious about all, for he is not. He provides much of the information in a non-biased, fair way. He states the facts or studies on some herbs as they are, and then may put in his personal recommendation, such as on the comfrey controversy. His inclusion of "how to use it" for each herb came in handy as well.From the hot hundred we go on to a listing of traditional favorites, broken down in the same way as above, then herbs from around the world (nice touch). Finally the herbal medicine cabinet has some basic and helpful remedies for a variety of complaints, from indigestion to colds and flu prevention. It ends with a chapter dedicated to women, then men, looking good, and aromatherapy.In short it is a good book but because the scope was so large everything was kept short, basic, and simple...too much so. You learned a small amount about every herb, but not enough to really know any herb well enough. I would rather have a book that covered them in depth than barely brushing across them. All of it is generic and cautious.While good for a beginner, there are others out there that educate more and allow one to see the bigger picture of things. Sometimes people who are past the beginners stages take great joy and still learn from basic herbals, I know I do, but this isn't the case here. I'm afraid if you've passed Herbalism 101 you'll be bored soon with this. Stick to it if you only want to know the basics a small bit at a time.

Culpeper's Complete Herbal

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4.05 rating

Comment 1: While this is an abridged version of Culpeper's original, it's very helpful to have large illustrations and updated information on each plant. However, for the full effect of the herbal lore, you'd probably want to go to the original source (many free versions available online). There is also not much information in here for practical use, though there are lists at the end that could be a good starting point for research. I am glad to see that Potterton recommends that the reader seek help from Comment 2: Due to the nature of Nicholas Culpepper's language/the era it was written, sometimes the information may seem sketchy to the untrained eye, but I own two copies of this book & my mother has owned a copy since I was very young (if not before I was born) and I swear by it or any information about healing attributes of herbs, vegetables and other things grown in uk hedgerows that have been long forgotten. Brilliant stuff :) Comment 3: Very much a specialty item, which makes it hard to review. Culpeper discusses the virtues of various plants, and their names (Christ's Eye, Clown's Woodword, Dead Nettle, the Melancholy Thistle and Piss-a-Bed among them) and healing properties, while emphasizing that he's researching this stuff, not just regurgitating the classics (of course his idea of research includes looking at the astrological ties of each plant).

Complete Illustrated Guide to Holistic Herbal: A Safe and Practical Guide to Making and Using Herbal Remedies

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4.27 rating

This is a safe and practical guide to making and using herbal remedies. Herbal medicine is enjoying a much deserved revival with more and more people turning to its safe, natural remedies which are free from harmful side-effects. This book offers clear, step-by-step advice on the use of herbal medicine for the safe treatment of a wide range of complaints. Its unique holistic approach enables you to restore and maintain wellbeing by treating the body as a whole. The text includes: clear explanation of the body's systems; treatment of a wide range of complaints and diseases; how to gather herbs and prepare remedies; and an A-Z herbal featuring more than 200 herbs.

The Herbalist's Way: The Art and Practice of Healing with Plant Medicines

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4.32 rating

This updated edition of The Village Herbalist provides a complete guide to the art and practice of herbalism, as well as an introduction to the herbalist's role in family and community life. Inspirational profiles of practicing herbalists from across the country add a human touch to the authors' wealth of practical herbal knowledge.The Herbalist's Way includes time-honored healing wisdom from many cultures, as well as information on: - Roles and responsibilities of herbalists in their communities - Herbal workshops, conferences, and education centers - Growing, drying, and preparing medicinal herbs - Learning to listen to clients and recommend holistic treatments for healing and continued wellness - Licensing, marketing, and other legal and business issues facing modern herbalists - Comprehensive resources and suggestions for building your herbal library

The Herbal Handbook: A User's Guide to Medical Herbalism

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4.18 rating

This comprehensive guide to medical herbalism offers a practical reference to medicinal herbs and how they act in the body. Hoffmann organizes the text around the systems of the body, and categorizes treatments by specific actions herbs have on the body systems. Accessible and thorough, this book can serve as a desk reference for health professionals, as well as an easy-to-understand introduction for the layperson Includes information on growing, drying, storing, and preparation of herbs, with recipes for infusions, decoctions, oils, and ointments. Provides a missing gap in popular herbal literature. A useful, welcome book for both novice and experienced herbalists.

The Way of Herbs

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4.16 rating

This guide offers comprehensive descriptions of herbal treatments for cancer, arthritis, colds and influenza. It shows how to gain and maintain health through a holistic approach, with information on simple herb remedies, and descriptions of more than 140 Western herbs and 31 Chinese herbs.

Healing Spices: How to Use 50 Everyday and Exotic Spices to Boost Health and Beat Disease

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4.42 rating

Breakthrough scientific research is finding that spices-even more than herbs, fruits, and vegetables-are loaded with antioxidants and other unique health-enhancing compounds. Studies of dietary patterns around the world confirm that spice-consuming populations have the lowest incidence of such life-threatening illnesses as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer's. Bharat B. Aggarwal, the world's foremost expert on the therapeutic use of culinary spices, takes an in-depth look at 50 different spices and their curative qualities, and offers spice “prescriptions”-categorized by health condition-to match the right spice to a specific ailment.

Complete Guide to Medicinal Herbs

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4.26 rating

Here is the classic volume on herbal medicine, fully updated with completely revised text and now including over 120 herbs. Inside you'll find comprehensive information and more on ancient wisdom and herbalism today. Herbalism is among the world's oldest healing systems, encompassing Chinese, Indian, Australian, Native American, and traditional Western medicines. Its benefits offer gentle treatment without the side effects of orthodox pharmaceutical drugs. This holistic approach encourages full body fitness and mental health, and provides an opportunity to take charge of your health and control your own well-being. This Complete Guide to Medicinal Herbs offers the perfect assortment of information to anyone interested in learning about herbalism, and to those who already have some knowledge of the subject and want to begin the basics of self-treatment. Beginning with the history of herbal medicine, it moves on to comprehensive, A-Z coverage of hundreds of herbs, giving information about their appearance, active parts, applications, and preparation. It features a compendium of common ailments and illnesses, with advice on herbal treatment for each one. A final section offers advice on finding and consulting a herbalist. Drawn from venerable traditions around the world, medicinal herbalism has a wealth of wisdom and advice to offer the modern world. This Complete Guide to Medicinal Herbs provides a thorough understanding of how herbs can help you revolutionize your health and well-being.

Opening Our Wild Hearts to the Healing Herbs

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4.22 rating

This charming book weaves herbal lore, wise woman tradition, and personal experience into a magical and spiritual tapestry. Gail Faith Edward's directions for growing, harvesting, and utilizing Nature's green gifts are surpassed only by her ability to express her own Wild Heart. Experienced herbalists and novices alike will be inspired by her vast knowledge and uplifting spirit. Includes 113 trees and herbs for medicine, food, and beauty.

The Complete Herbal Guide: A Natural Approach to Healing the Body - Heal Your Body Naturally and Maintain Optimal Health Using Alternative Medicine, Herbals, Vitamins, Fruits and Vegetables

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3.95 rating

"The Complete Herbal Guide: A Natural Approach to Healing the Body - Heal Your Body Naturally and Maintain Optimal Health Using Alternative Medicine, Herbals, Vitamins, Fruits and Vegetables," is an essential reference book for anyone interested in maintaining optimal health and overcoming disease. The book contains concise and comprehensive listings of hundreds of herbs, vitamins, and supplements that can cure common medical conditions. This book has quick and easy references to all the information you need to maintain excellent health the natural way.

20,000 Secrets of Tea: The Most Effective Ways to Benefit from Nature's Healing Herbs

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4.13 rating

Fight Colds and Flu Lower Cholesterol Beat Depression Banish Fatigue Enhance Memory Lose Weight And More!An ancient Chinese legend: Once there was a man who knew 100,000 healing properties of herbs. He taught his son 80,000 secrets. On his deathbed, he told his son to visit his grave in five years, and there he would find the other 20,000 secrets. When the son went to his father's grave, he found, growing on the site, the tea shrub....Teas are the gentle, natural, most beneficial way to absorb the healing properties of herbs--easily and inexpensively. A simple cup of tea not only has the power to soothe and relax but to deliver healing herbal agents to the bloodstream more quickly than capsules, tinctures, or infusions. Feeling tired? Rose hip tea will rev you up and beautify your skin. Need some help with your diet? Ginger tea will provide the boost you need and help aching joints too. Hot or iced, these pure and simple drinks offer delicious ways to stay healthy and revitalize you from the inside out. This unique guide offers:An A-Z listing of common ailments followed by the teas best used to treat themInstructions on how to create your own medicinal kitchenAdvice on creating your own tea blendsDescriptions of the top 100 herbs and their secret healing propertiesAnd much, much more!